The waters of Table Mountain – Part 3: Streams & Ravines

It is one of the many joys of hiking Table Mountain to come upon a burbling stream, a secluded pool or a cascade pattering down on solid rock from up
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The waters of Table Mountain – Part 3: Streams & Ravines

It is one of the many joys of hiking Table Mountain to come upon a burbling stream, a secluded pool or a cascade pattering down on solid rock from up
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The waters of Table Mountain – Part 2: The Reservoirs

Up until the mid 1880s, Cape Town relied on a single Table Mountain stream for its water supply: the Varsche River, a confluence of three smaller streams that drains the
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The waters of Table Mountain – Part 1: Early Days

In my next three blogs I will briefly trace the story of Table Mountain’s water, from the role it played in the establishment of Cape Town to its coming of
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'The one who is afraid of the sun'

I’m not really into frogs. I love their croaking – especially in misty conditions on the mountain, when it lends an air of mystery to the landscape – but otherwise
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‘The one who is afraid of the sun’

I’m not really into frogs. I love their croaking – especially in misty conditions on the mountain, when it lends an air of mystery to the landscape – but otherwise
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Mountains are not forever

All around the globe, the erosive forces of nature – wind, rain, rivers, oceans, glaciers, earthquakes – are at work on mountains, whittling them down grain by grain, reducing them
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Skeleton Gorge: To do or not to do

I’m often amazed at how many people, even non-hikers, know about the existence of Skeleton Gorge. In some ways, it has achieved brand status when it comes to hiking on
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The highest point on Table Mountain

Despite its flat summit, Table Mountain does have a high point. Not exactly a peak or lofty spire, but a humble outcrop elevated 20-odd meters above the surrounding landscape. Marking
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Table Mountain's most common mammal

  Mammals used to be a common sight on Table Mountain back in the day, but man’s encroachment reduced them in numbers and species. Except for one: the ubiquitous Rock
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