Monthly Archives August 2012

Photo of the week: September week #1

  Table Mountain lacks big game for two reasons: its nutrient-poor plants can’t sustain large grazers or herds of antelope; and the few large animal species adapted to the environment have been hunted out to the point of extinction. It should therefore come as no big surprise to know that the largest animal on Table Mountain is in fact an alien – an introduced specie,
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Quote of the week: September week #1

“The sight of the summit beacon indicates something accomplished by very real and patient effort, and often by skill and daring. It is the slow persistent step-by-step which has conquered the heights. There is no hurry, no spasmodic rush. It is a quiet, steady, joyous, upward movement, typifying the daily upward climb of the individual towards the realisation of the highest ideals and ultimate goal.”
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Springtime hiking on Table Mountain

There is no bad season to hike Table Mountain, only 3 good ones and one superb, the latter being spring. Here’s why: Weather: Summer hiking can be oppressively hot and very windy; winter hiking, cold and wet. In spring (September to November) the weather is more temperate, often balmy and windless. Streams still trickle down the mountain from the winter rains. Flora: Some parts of the
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Table Mountain's winged scavengers

A familiar sight when hiking on Table Mountain is the white-necked raven. They’re often seen gliding overhead, riding the thermals, uttering their croaky caw – one of the most recognizable sounds on Table Mountain. On hot days in summer, with heat shimmering off the rocks and the mountain baking under a torrid sun, two sounds break the oppressive silence on the mountain: the screech of
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Table Mountain’s winged scavengers

A familiar sight when hiking on Table Mountain is the white-necked raven. They’re often seen gliding overhead, riding the thermals, uttering their croaky caw – one of the most recognizable sounds on Table Mountain. On hot days in summer, with heat shimmering off the rocks and the mountain baking under a torrid sun, two sounds break the oppressive silence on the mountain: the screech of
Read More

Photo of the Week: August week #4

 View north towards Table Mountain from Separation Buttress, one of the Twelve Apostles – circa 1894. Actually, circa just the other day! I couldn’t stop myself from changing this photo from full-color to sepia. The almost complete absence of habitation (with mist conveniently obscuring the suburb of Camps Bay in the distance), of all things man-made, prompted me to render this view in sepia, giving
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Quote of the Week: August week #4

“How many people know that a football match has been played upon the top of Table Mountain? Yet it was so, for in the very early ‘nineties (1890s) there was a description of how the corporals and lance corporals of the North Staffordshire Regiment, then stationed at the Cape, climbed the mountain with that very purpose. The opposing sides were ‘A’ team and ‘B’ team
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Why it's easy to underestimate hiking up Table Mountain

In some ways, Table Mountain can be likened to a caged lion. Hemmed in by urban sprawl and crowned with a cable station, it appears tame and subdued as far as mountains go. But despite its accessibility, Table Mountain retains much of her primal ‘instincts’. Let’s take a look at the 4 main factors that make hiking on Table Mountain more than a petty proposition.
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Why it’s easy to underestimate hiking up Table Mountain

In some ways, Table Mountain can be likened to a caged lion. Hemmed in by urban sprawl and crowned with a cable station, it appears tame and subdued as far as mountains go. But despite its accessibility, Table Mountain retains much of her primal ‘instincts’. Let’s take a look at the 4 main factors that make hiking on Table Mountain more than a petty proposition.
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Quote of the Week: August week #3

“To the mountaineer, paths are like those human and self-forgetful (selfless) souls in stories who bring two lovers together and then tip-toe discreetly out of the room; having fulfilled their purpose they should vanish, leaving him alone with nature.” Extract from the 1937 Journal of the Mountain Club of South Africa.   Whether dipping into a dell, skirting an exposed ledge, teetering on a knife-edge
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