Photo of the week – March week #4: Table Mountain hikes on the Southern Apostles

View north from the top of Myburgh's Buttress.

View north from the top of Myburgh’s Buttress.

Table Mountain hiking is far more than only the trails leading up the iconic tabletop summit. The Eastern Buttresses with their jungle-clad lower slopes, the secluded valley known as Orange Kloof and the string of peaks extending behind the tabletop known as the 12 Apostles. The southern segment of this range is the part of Table Mountain located furthest from the city, offering much nature: peace, quiet, solitude, pristine landscapes.

Several Table Mountain hikes lead up this bastion of the mountain, most of them rarely done. The main route into the area is Llandudno Ravine, involving nothing complicated other than a few bits of basic, non-exposed scrambling. The upper half of the route may be varied by branching onto Hout Bay Corner, a great little adventure route for those looking for a challenge.

If you like jungle settings, Myburgh’s Kloof and Myburgh’s Waterfall Ravine won’t disappoint. Hiking Table Mountain allows access a variety of terrain and views, and you can go from indigenous jungle to shrub-clad slope with sea views in less than an hour. Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Llandudno Peak Traverse and Lekkerwater Traverse contours along the base of the southernmost Apostles, leading through a remote part of the mountain along a rugged trail. You may gain the summit at their furthest points via Victoria Gully – a challenging scramble not to be trifled with – or Victoria Ravine.

If you love nature and getting off the beaten track, then hiking Table Mountain via one of the above routes will be an unforgettable experience. Table Mountain hikes on this part of the mountain also offer superb views in all directions, and unique angles on the famous tabletop summit.

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